Kathy Palmer - Wrentham MA Real Estate, Norfolk MA Real Estate, Plainville MA Real Estate


If you are preparing to buy a house in the foreseeable future, you'll want to check out lots of home listings. That way, you can browse dozens of residences at your convenience and boost your chances of finding a terrific house.

Ultimately, there are several factors that homebuyers should consider as they evaluate house listings, and these factors are:

1. A Home's Age and Condition

A home's age and condition are key considerations for all homebuyers, at all times. If you assess a house's age and condition in a home listing, you may be better equipped than ever before to determine whether a residence is right for you.

Oftentimes, a home seller will provide the year that a residence was built in a house listing. A seller also may include details about any home upgrades and when these were performed, such as the installation of a new roof or heating and cooling system.

Study a house's age and condition closely – you'll be glad you did. If you evaluate these factors in a home listing, you can narrow your home search as needed.

2. A Home's Price

You know that you want to acquire a house, but you need to consider how you'll pay for a residence too. Fortunately, a home listing includes a house's price, ensuring you can find out whether a residence falls within your price range.

If a house exceeds your price range, you may still want to check it out as well. Remember, the initial asking price of a house is not set in stone, and you may be able to negotiate with a home seller.

For a buyer who reviews a house listing and is unsure about whether to pursue a residence based on its price, assistance is available. In fact, if you meet with local lenders, you can evaluate many mortgage options, get pre-approved for a mortgage and establish a homebuying budget.

3. A Home's Location

Think about whether you want to live in a city or town as you assess home listings. By doing so, you can perform a fast, efficient home search and increase the likelihood of discovering a house in your ideal city or town.

Furthermore, it usually is a good idea to think about your day-to-day activities prior to looking at home listings. If you want to own a house that's close to your office in the city, you may want to review home listings for residences in or near the city itself. Comparatively, if you prefer small town living, you can examine home listings in small towns across the United States.

If you need assistance during your home search, you may want to hire a real estate agent. This housing market professional can provide timely, accurate home listings for residences as soon as these houses become available. As a result, a real estate agent can make it easy for you to pursue many outstanding residences and find one that you can enjoy for years to come.


Today’s home buyers see hundreds if not thousands of real estate photos when they’re in the market. Odds are that they’ll eliminate a number of homes from their search before ever even setting foot in them.

As you can imagine, that makes your home listing’s photographs all the more important to securing solid leads on your house.

In spite of the importance of photographs, a number of sellers get them wrong. To ensure that your home listing’s photos make a great first impression, we’re going to take a look at some of the common mistakes to avoid in your listing photography.

1. Not taking enough photos

In the age of digital photography, you can never take too many pictures. Experiment with different lighting, setups, and angles, and don’t be afraid to take as many photos as necessary to get the shots you want.

2. Going overboard with the uploads

It might be tempting to upload all of the pictures you took of your home, but it could hurt your overall presentation. Sort carefully through your pictures and pick one or two photos that best showcase each room and another one to three photos of the home’s exterior and land.

Visitors to your listing will get bored and click away if you have a slideshow with hundreds of images. Make it easy for them to find exactly what they’re looking for by limiting the number of total photos of your home.

3. Avoid close-ups

Your home should be spotlessly clean and tidy when taking photos. However, that doesn’t mean you need to get up close to each object in your home to take photos. Try to take wide shots that make your home feel spacious and welcoming.

4. Look out for mirrors and reflections and other distractions

If there’s one way to ruin an otherwise serene photo of your home, it’s when you spot the photographer accidentally showing up in the shot. Plan your angles so that you don’t get any flashes, glare, or reflections in your photographs.

And, while we’re on the topic of distractions, it’s a good idea to take your pets out of the room before your start shooting. Remember, potential home buyers don’t love your dog or cat like you do.

5. Don’t settle with your first shots

The different (or lack) of lighting your home receives throughout the day can make or break your photos. Try taking photos of your home at midday, when there are the least amount of shadows. Then, shoot some photos at golden hour (just before the sun sets) to capture warm tones. Finally, right after dusk, turn the lights on in your home and take some shots from outside. These photos give the illusion of a warm, cozy place where the light is always on.


Attending a home showing often represents a major milestone in the homebuying journey. But after you take an up-close look at a house, how should you proceed?

There are many questions to consider after you attend a home showing, including:

1. What Did You Think of the Home?

Although it may appear to be love at first sight after you view a property for the first time, it usually is better to err on the side of caution. Thus, after you check out a home, you may want to take at least a few hours to assess the property.

Does the residence fit your budget? Is the property big enough to accommodate your family? And is the residence close to your office? These are just some of the questions that you'll want to consider as you evaluate the pros and cons of a house.

Also, don't forget to consult with your real estate agent. This professional may be able to offer additional insights into a house that you might struggle to obtain elsewhere. By doing so, your real estate agent can help you determine how to proceed with a residence.

2. Should I Submit an Offer?

The decision to submit an offer on a house is a big one, particularly for those who want to purchase a high-quality property at a budget-friendly price.

Ultimately, you'll want to look at various housing market factors before you submit an offer on a residence. Consider how long a residence has been listed as well as the prices of comparable houses in the same city or town. Furthermore, you'll want to consider the property's condition and whether major repairs will be needed in the near future.

Your real estate agent can help you put together a competitive offer on a house that won't exceed your budget. This housing market professional will enable you to examine the pros and cons of a residence and make it easy for you to decide how to move forward after a home showing.

3. What Are My Options?

Homebuyers have many options after they view a house. They may choose to submit an offer on the residence. Or, if a house fails to meet their expectations, homebuyers can continue to explore the real estate market.

No homebuyer should feel backed into a corner after a home showing. Fortunately, your real estate agent will be able to outline all of your options. This real estate professional will simplify the process of finding your dream house and allocate the necessary time and resources to explain all of the options at your disposal.

Perhaps best of all, your real estate agent can answer any concerns or questions at each stage of the homebuying journey. That way, if you're uncertain about a residence that you recently viewed, your real estate agent will be able to respond to your queries without delay.

Take advantage of home showings, and you should have no trouble discovering your ideal residence.


One question that crosses many homebuyers’ minds is “Will it be cheaper to buy or build a home?” There’s many pros and cons of both new and older construction homes. The price you pay is a big part of how the entire decision breaks down.


Initial Costs


Prices for existing homes vary widely based on where you live. The same principle goes for buying land and constructing a home. You can check on the specifics of the price per square foot in your area for more details. These costs could have the biggest impact on how you go about the path to homeownership and what area you decide to settle down in. 


Keep in mind that new homes are often more spacious. This drives the cost per square foot down, yet there’s more square footage in the home. 


Cost Of Upkeep


Any kind of home has its regular maintenance tasks and costs that are included with the job of homeownership. Landscaping, the servicing of appliances, the upkeep of filters, and heating and cooling system maintenance are all a part of owning a home. If you buy an older home, however, you’re guaranteed to have a few more costs to worry about. If appliances are on their last leg or the roof is nearing the end of its lifespan, you’re going to need to foot the bill for the replacement cost. 


A new construction home can have issues as well, but it’s less likely to happen. The problems that happen in a new construction home are more likely to be due to building issues. Newer homes can, however, have a protection of up to 10 years with a new construction warranty. 


The Great Outdoors


When you buy an existing home, one of the major perks of it is that the landscaping is mature. There’s no need to plant grass, bushes, and flowers because there’s usually something in place. It’s less of an expense to have something to work with when it comes to landscaping. Trees that have been strategically placed can often add a lot of value to a property. 


On the other hand, building a new home can add years to the process of a finished landscape for a home. You’ll need to deal with tedious upkeep and spend thousands of dollars to get the property’s outdoor spaces looking green and beautiful. 


Energy Efficiency And Technology


If you buy a new home, you have the advantage of keeping up with the latest technology and energy efficiency standards. New construction homes are usually much more efficient than older homes. In a new home, you also have the advantage of being able to install smart technologies like thermostats and security systems to streamline with construction. These tools make your home more secure and easier for you to manage. 


There are a few different advantages to both buying an existing home and buying a new construction home. Your needs and your budget will determine the decision that’s right for you.


Looking to move out of a big city? Relocate to a small town, and you can enjoy the simple joys of small town life.

Many people prefer the small town lifestyle, and for good reason. In a small town, you won't have to worry about excess traffic or noise. Plus, many homes are available in small towns nationwide, ensuring you should have no trouble discovering a wonderful residence without having to worry about breaking your budget.

Kick off your search for a small town home today – here are three tips to help you secure a terrific small town house.

1. Study the Local Housing Market Closely

What are you looking for in a small town home? Ultimately, you'll want to consider exactly what you'd like to find in a small town house before you conduct your search for the ideal residence.

Creating a checklist of must-haves is essential. With this list, you'll be able to examine available homes in a small town and narrow your search accordingly.

Also, don't forget to examine the prices of recently sold houses in a small town. This housing market data will enable you to differentiate between a seller's market and a buyer's market.

2. Get Financing Before You Start Your Home Search

Can you afford a small town home? It all depends on the financing at your disposal.

Meet with several banks and credit unions to explore your mortgage options. That way, you can learn about fixed- and adjustable-rate mortgages and obtain financing.

If you ever have concerns or questions about home financing, be sure to ask a lender for assistance.

Remember, banks and credit unions employ mortgage professionals who are happy to help you in any way they can. These mortgage experts can teach you about different types of mortgage and offer personalized mortgage recommendations, ensuring you can get the financing you need to make your homeownership dreams come true.

3. Collaborate with an Experienced Real Estate Agent

When it comes to the real estate market, it is always better to err on the side of caution. Fortunately, real estate agents are available in small towns and big cities alike and will do whatever it takes to help you find a great house.

Hiring an experienced real estate agent who understands the properties that are currently available in a small town is vital. This real estate professional will offer tips throughout the homebuying process, guaranteeing that you can make informed decisions at every stage.

Perhaps best of all, an experienced real estate agent will take the guesswork out of buying a small town home. He or she will set up home showings and open houses, keep you up to date about new properties as they become available and negotiate with home sellers on your behalf. As a result, this real estate professional will streamline the process of going from homebuyer to homeowner.

Take the next step to acquire a home in a small town – use these homebuying tips, and you can locate a small town home that can serve you well for years to come.




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